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Reserve with Google Adds New Tools and Services

Reserve with Google Adds New Tools and Services

Google has added a handful of bells and whistles to their Reserve with Google product, a tool that lets users schedule appointments or reservations with local businesses via Search, a dedicated website, or Maps.

Currently covering “Fitness” and “Beauty,” Reserve with Google recently added “Restaurants,” and is in the process of integrating services like Bookatable, Dimmi, Mindbody, Peek, and others. They hope to add more (like Ticketmaster, TripAdvisor, and Yelp) in the future.

In bringing transaction capabilities directly into local search results, Google is looking to provide a more frictionless experience. For businesses who thrive on bookings, this could be an interesting area to explore.

Growth in Non-Social Native Advertising Attributed to Marketers’ Demand for Options

Growth in Non-Social Native Advertising Attributed to Marketers’ Demand for Options

Driven by video, non-social native advertising is growing at nearly 2x the rate of native advertising on the social platforms.

That’s the key takeaway of a new report published by ad-tech firm, TripleLift. According to their research, video comprises 26% of non-social native spend (a 63% increase from 2017), and is expected to continue to outpace other formats.

“Marketers are looking for greater choice and control over their media and measurement,” says TripleLift cofounder, Ari Lewine. “Non-social native provides an option that gives them the choice and control they are looking for.”

The report also looks at how outstream video ads fit into the overall non-social ad market. Introduced just a few years ago, these  have matured and offer a number of choices for consumers and marketers. Most importantly, they’ve become more respectful of the content they surround, providing a more “user-centric and respectful” consumer experience.

Teens’ Love for Streaming Video Seen as a Threat to Pay TV

Teens’ Love for Streaming Video Seen as a Threat to Pay TV

According to Piper Jaffray’s semi-annual “Taking Stock With Teens” survey, the love teens continue to show for streaming video is posing a clear threat to the future of linear pay TV.

In their analysis, the research firm found that the top three sources for video consumption among teens were Netflix (38%), YouTube (33%), and cable TV (16%).

The study also explored this segment’s preferences among brands, shopping websites (Amazon: 47%), and social media channels (Snapchat: 46%).

Apple CEO Seeks Regulations Against “Weaponized Use” of Data  

Apple CEO Seeks Regulations Against “Weaponized Use” of Data

Speaking to privacy regulators gathered in Brussels for the International Conference of Data Protection and Privacy Commissioners, Apple CEO Tim Cook called for a “comprehensive federal privacy law in the United States.”

Citing Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) as inspirational, Cook compared the practice of gathering massive amounts of user data to surveillance, adding that “rogue actors and even governments have taken advantage of user trust to deepen divisions, incite violence, and even undermine our shared sense of what is true and what is false.”

“This crisis,” he said, “is real. It is not imagined, or exaggerated, or crazy.” 

Samsung to Sue Paid Influencer for Using Rival Product

Samsung to Sue Paid Influencer for Using Rival Product

Samsung is suing contracted influencer Ksenia Sobchak (you know, the “Russian Paris Hilton”?) for allegedly using an iPhone X instead of their handsets.

Under the terms of her agreement with the smartphone manufacturer, Sobchak (who’s also a television personality, journalist, and erstwhile politician) is not allowed to use (or even be seen with) a competing product in public.

This rule, says Samsung, was broken during a recent television interview and – according to some reports – several other times, too. In response to the numerous infractions, Samsung has filed a suit against Sobchak for a reported 108 million rubles (approximately $1.6 million US) for breach of contract.

While it’s unknown how much she was originally paid, it’s very likely that the filing claims damages that are far higher in value, including penalties for breaking their agreement.

A lesson to be learned for influencers everywhere.